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Insider Secrets to Creating Space in Your Tiny House

As someone who works in the tiny house industry, one of the questions that I get the most is, “Where do you put all of your stuff?”. This is the major struggle that most people seem to have with tiny houses (yes, even more than the composting toilet). But with a little ingenuity and creativity, even 154 square feet can feel like a much larger space.

Lose It

We all know that you need less stuff to live in a tiny house, but perhaps you can pare down a little more. I know, I know, you’ve already gotten rid of so much, but hear me out. Items like extra cutlery or cooking tools that you keep around just in case are not necessary. Have you used them in the last three months? Do you have an event happening in the next three months that you will need them for? If your answer is “no,” get rid of them. Not only does this physically clear up space, but the less clutter you see in your house, the more open it will feel.

Multi-Purpose Is Always the Answer

  • In such a small space, almost everything should have more than one use. In 84 Tiny Living houses, we build in as much storage as we can while keeping the structural integrity of the house. For example, the picture below shows how the stairs in our Countryside model also have two areas for storage built into it — one closet and a shelf above it.

  • Beyond the built-in storage features, carefully consider any other furniture you bring in. For example, an ottoman that opens up can be the perfect way to add functional seating and
  • Corner shelves can also be multi-purpose as many of them make cool conversation pieces. They also act as a way to display your items (and keep them off of the floor or countertop).

Make Use of Vertical Space

  • Have wall space? Add a shelf or cabinet. Keep in mind that an open shelf gives the illusion of more space, but if you are someone who travels with your tiny house, a glass cabinet door may be helpful to keep everything in its spot.
  • A DIY ceiling-hanging clothing rack made from a pipe or bamboo dowel rod and some chain or rope is a purposeful and an efficient use of space.
  • Don’t want to mount a TV, but still want the option to watch movies or a show in your tiny house? Buy a white screen that doubles as a blind for your windows and a projector.
  • A ladder in the dead space behind your door makes for a great decorative rack to hang blankets or other items from. Or you can build a vertical shoe rack there that will help you, and your guests, remember to take your shoes off as you enter the house.

Make Room for Essentials

  • A simple mesh holder that hangs from your shower curtain can save space while keeping everything tidy and in one place.
  • Over-the-door racks or interior organizers on your cabinets are great for smaller items that you don’t want to lose in your cupboard.
  • A well-placed mirror always helps; reflective surfaces give the impression of more light in a space.

These are just a few ideas that you can use. Do you have experience living in a tiny space or have other ideas?  Share them with us below!

Countryside Exterior Progress Photo

Countryside Progress #2

Check out the building progress photos from our newest tiny house model, the Countryside! This phase included beginning the installation of the composite roofing, and framing of the windows and doors.  Stay tuned to see what’s next!

 

Countryside Building Progress Photos - Exterior with Composite Roofing Added

Exterior Progress Photo with Composite Roofing Added

 

Countryside Interior Progress Photo

Interior Progress Photo

Tiny Houses for the Masses

If you thought the tiny house movement was just a fad, think again. 84 Lumber, a major national retailer of building materials and services, just launched a series of tiny houses, available in flexible packages targeting anyone who might be interested in this lifestyle. In other words, 84 Lumber is out to make tiny house living as accessible as possible, whether the customer is serious DIY-er or somehow who just wants a fast, easy turnkey micro home.

The company, which already offers building packages for structures like barns and garages, spent the last half year developing the line of four tiny house models, all of which are under 200 square feet and are now available to order, with an estimated turnaround time of about 8 to 10 weeks for a fully outfitted home.

The Roving, the first model with a fully built-out prototype (available to tour at the company’s headquarters in Eighty Four, PA), is a 154-square-foot tiny house with cedar lap siding, a lofted full-sized bed, mini front porch, and reclaimed wood details. The other three models, two of which are shown in the visualization below, range in styles from the more cottage-like to the more modern.

Beyond the design, 84 Lumber’s “cater to everyone” approach also extends to the packages and pricing. For those who are ready to roll up their sleeves and build their own tiny house, the company is offering a $6,884 (starting) “DIY package” that includes architectural blueprints, materials list, and a trailer outfitted with a subfloor and ready for walls. Next level up is the $19,884 (starting) “Semi-DIY package” that includes a “shelled in” tiny house on a trailer, along with windows, a door, a shower, and blueprints and a material list for finishing the home inside and out. And starting from $49,884, the move-in ready option comes fully furnished with a trailer, composting toilet, Energy Star-certified appliances, and LED lighting.

In the realm of tiny houses under 200 square feet, these price points are competitive, though neither radically affordable nor outrageously pricey. For comparison, there are a few move-in ready homes of comparable size offered in the $40,000 to $47,000 range, as well as custom-designed tiny homes that start at $79,000. Still, 84 Lumber’s tiered packages and national footprint—the tiny houses can be ordered in any of its 200 stores around the country—should certainly bring another level of accessibility.

The missing part of the puzzle is, of course, the tricky zoning stuff—that is, where, if at all, will cities allow people to park and live in these tiny houses, and not just as second dwellings attached to primary residences? As the crop of tiny home ventures (Rentable rural micro retreats! Eco-friendly pod dwellings!) continues to expand though, surely communities will soon have to take a stance.

—By Curbed’s Jenny Xie. Read the original article here.